2015-12-15

When trees die, water slows

Mountain pine beetle populations have exploded over the past decade due to warmer temperatures and drier summers, and these insects have infected and killed thousands of acres of western pine forests. Researchers have predicted that as trees died, streamflow would increase because fewer trees would take up water through their roots.

A recent study by University of Utah geology and geophysics professor Paul Brooks and his colleagues in Arizona, Colorado and Idaho, found that if too many trees die, compensatory processes kick in and may actually reduce water availability. When large areas of trees die, the forest floor becomes sunnier, warmer and windier, which causes winter snow and summer rain to evaporate rather than slowly recharging groundwater.

The bad news is that the loss of so many trees may not help alleviate the long-term drought in the West as many have hoped. The good news is that researchers can use the new understanding of forest water cycle to manage healthier forests that are more resistant to drought but still supply water to agriculture and cities downstream.

2015-12-14

Pine Beetle wreaks havoc in region

Ryan Zapisocki swings a leg over his skidoo, fires up the engine and rides into the forest. The snow is melting and a warm breeze is blowing through the pines, causing them to sway slowly against each other. Some needles on the trees are tinged red, others, deep auburn. He slows as he arrives at his destination: a gathering of trees marked with ribbons. These are the ones that will be cut and burned come this February.

“There are heavier infestations in the west near Jasper,” he says, leaning forward in his chair and pointing to a map on the wall. “The pine beetles in this region are coming from that direction.”

Zapisocki is a quality inspector who started checking surveyed areas last week. He and a crew of four have been contracted by Alberta Parks and Environment to help deal with the Mountain Pine Beetle.