2015-02-08

Agencies Say Black Hills Pine Beetles Growing At Slower Pace

A new aerial analysis of the Black Hills National Forest shows the pine beetle epidemic is still growing but slower than before.

The Rapid City Journal reports the survey filed by state and federal agencies found that about 16,500 acres were newly identified last year as affected by mountain pine beetles.

The U.S. Forest Service says that’s a sign the epidemic is slowing, after 34,000 acres were newly affected in 2013.

2015-02-02

Ravaged by pine beetles, fire hazards loom large in B.C. forests

When the China Nose fire raced across the Interior Plateau south of Houston and Burns Lake last summer, it was a reminder – not that one was needed – of just how dangerous a forest is after it’s been killed by pine beetles.

The insect infestation has spread over 18 million hectares in British Columbia, leaving a dry, fire-prone forest behind. Some of the most intense damage is in the area where the China Nose blaze consumed more than 3,000 hectares, and logging companies in that region are acutely aware of the fire hazard.

Or they should be.

2015-01-20

Saskatchewan and Alberta pair up to fight mountain pine beetle

The Saskatchewan and Alberta governments have reaffirmed their long-standing co-operation on forest insects and disease, signing a three year agreement to work together on mountain pine beetle management. Saskatchewan will provide $1.25 million this year to help control the outbreak in Alberta, and to prevent or significantly slow the spread into Saskatchewan’s northern forest.

“By continuing to support Alberta’s effort to combat mountain pine beetles, we make the best use of our resources by protecting areas of Saskatchewan’s forests that are most at risk,” explained Saskatchewan’s Environment Minister, Scott Moe.

The funding will be used to support mountain pine beetle control actions in northern Alberta, including enhanced surveillance and monitoring, removal of infested trees, and research and modelling to effectively direct program efforts.

Saskatchewan and Alberta pair up to fight mountain pine beetle

The Saskatchewan and Alberta governments have reaffirmed their long-standing co-operation on forest insects and disease, signing a three year agreement to work together on mountain pine beetle management. Saskatchewan will provide $1.25 million this year to help control the outbreak in Alberta, and to prevent or significantly slow the spread into Saskatchewan’s northern forest.

“By continuing to support Alberta’s effort to combat mountain pine beetles, we make the best use of our resources by protecting areas of Saskatchewan’s forests that are most at risk,” explained Saskatchewan’s Environment Minister, Scott Moe.

The funding will be used to support mountain pine beetle control actions in northern Alberta, including enhanced surveillance and monitoring, removal of infested trees, and research and modelling to effectively direct program efforts.

2014-12-23

Meet The Tiny Beetle That's Killing Off Grizzly Bears

It's hard to think of too many animals that could take out a grizzly bear.

At nearly 1,000 pounds and standing up to eight feet tall on its hind legs, the razor-toothed beast seems immune to all but the fiercest of contenders — and yet, one of the biggest threats to grizzlies is a tiny animal, hardly bigger than your fingernail.

Meet the mountain pine beetle.